The Hip in Ice Hockey Part 5: How to Design the Optimal Hip Screening Protocol and Identify At-Risk Athletes

Designing and implementing testing and monitoring procedures to identify athletes who are at increased risk for suffering hip-related pathology is crucial for sustained, high-level, ice hockey performance.

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The Hip in Ice Hockey Part 4: The Cost of Injury

Having healthy hips is an integral facet of sustained, high-level ice hockey performance. Due to their heavy use in the sport, they are frequently injured. The financial, performance, and time-loss costs can be extremely burdensome.

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The Hip in Ice Hockey Part 3: The Groin Strain Impostors

There are many core and hip-related injuries that cause groin pain in ice hockey athletes. Although the groin pain is real, a groin strain may not be the primary cause. Here are a few hip pathologies that oftentimes result in groin pain.

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The Hip in Ice Hockey Part 2 – Hip Injury Epidemiology and the Coveted Groin Strain

If you missed Part 1, you can view it here.

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The Hip in Ice Hockey Part 1: The Role of the Hip and Non-contact Injuries in Sport

Sporting injuries can be caused by contact (e.g traumatic) or non-contact (e.g overuse) mechanisms in nature, with contact injuries more often being associated with extrinsic risk factors, which are out of the control of the athlete in a single, identifiable incident [1-5].

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Heart Rate Variability (HRV) in Sport: A Review of the Research

Most athletes and sport science personnel understand the importance of recovery after exercise, which is defined as the return of body homeostasis after training to pre-training or near pre-training levels [28].

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